Photo Focus Merge

On a recent trip I made two images of the same subject; one with the foreground in focus and the other with the background in focus. I settled on the image with the foreground in focus for future use in a gallery, article or print, as it conveyed a stronger message of the subject at hand.

A few weeks later while reviewing my images again, I thought to myself ‘What if I could overlay the two images and combine them to give me one in-focus image?’ The use of a tripod on the original shoot would have let me capture at a slower shutter speed and stop down to an aperture as small as f32, if necessary. However, I didn’t have it with me so, as they say, no use in crying over spilt milk! The image below focused on the background, with the rear of the boat not in critical focus.

Note: Click through any of the images for a larger light box view to see more information about the image and technique.
A photograph of an old boat and village in the background, with the camera lens focused on the background. This image is used here to show a technique in Photoshop known as Focus Merge.
In this image I focused on the background. Because the boat dominated the frame, this did not work for me.

I decided to try my luck with Google and search for ‘combine images, focus near, focus far.’ The search result Continue reading

Summer’s End

With summer firmly to a close here’s a few photos from the beautiful, warm and extended season ever slowly slipping into the next!

A purple wild clover flowering with a background field of same but out of focus.

In a recent photo article about the needs and wants of photography buyers, a simple request was image space to place a message. After all, why not? It’s not all about a pretty picture. Well, it is, but images are designed to sell a message and if there’s no message space the picture alone doesn’t always cut it! Continue reading